Fern eliminate air pollutants

This ancient plant offers a superior pollutants removal efficiency. A must have for an healthy home.

The importance of indoor air quality to human health has become of increasing interest in developed countries where inhabitants often spend over 90% of their time indoors.

Scientists studying the air-purification capacities of indoor plants have found that plants can absorb many other gases in addition to carbon dioxide, including a long list of volatile organic compounds (VOCs).

While most leafy plants are adept at purifying indoor air, some of the plants that scientists have found most useful in removing VOCs include Japanese royal ferns (Osmunda japonica), Spider plants (Chlorophytum comosum), Boston ferns (Nephrolepis exaltata), Purple Waffle plants (Hemigraphis alternata), English Ivy (Hedera helix), Areca Palms (Dypsis lutescens), Golden Pothos (Epipremnum aureum), Aloe Vera, Snake plants (Sansevieria trifasciata) and Peace Lilies (Spathiphyllum).

Fern is the common name for plants in the phylum or division Pterophyta, also known as Filicophyta, sometimes called sword or ladder fern. Ferns are vascular plants that reproduce via spores and have neither seeds nor flowers.

Ferns first appear in the fossil record about 360 million years ago.

These plants prefer a cool location with high humidity and indirect light. They’re relatively easy to grow, but they do need to stay moist. Check the Boston Fern’s soil daily to see if it needs water, and give it a good soak once per month.

Pollutants removed: Ammonia, Benzene, Formaldehyde, Trichloroethylene, Toluene, Octane, Terpene.

Know more:

Tips for growing fern plants

From contamination to beautification: ferns remove arsenic from soil

Screening Indoor Plants for Volatile Organic Pollutant Removal Efficiency

Screening Indoor Plants for Volatile Organic Pollutant Removal Efficiency - PDF

NASA Clean Air Study